technique

Electronics and Signal Processing for Experimental Rigs

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Course Director: John Assad

Course Instructors: Ofer Mazor, Pavel Gorelik

 

Course description:

Biomedical researchers often use, or even building, experimental rigs consisting of several interconnected electronic instruments. These rigs are typically used to make high-quality recordings of weak biological signals. The goal of this course is to demystify the rig: What does each instrument do? How should they be connected? How does one troubleshoot noise, or adjust settings in a principled way...

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Light-Sheet Microscopy for Neuroscientists

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2020

Course Directors: Aurelien Begue, PhD (HMS) and Jason DeBruyne, PhD (MSM)

Course Description: Fluorescent light-sheet microscopy is a versatile microscopy technique that has diverse applications to neuroscience research and offers many advantages to other imaging methods. This nanocourse, offered as part of the MAHPING collaboration between Harvard Medical School and Morehouse School of Medicine, will introduce neuroscientists who have little or no experience with light-...

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Arduino for Biologists: Building scientific instruments using Arduino

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2020

Director: John Assad

Instructors: Ofer Mazor, Pavel Gorelik, Brett Graham

Course description:

The Arduino is a powerful and inexpensive digital microcontrollers that can be used to develop custom lab instruments. Many tasks that used to require a PC or expensive hardware can be put together with an Arduino and tens of dollars worth of parts. Developing microcontroller-based tools allows researchers to automate and scale up aspects of their research that were previously unfeasible.

This nanocourse will cover the basics of programming an...

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Toxicity of Cancer Therapy - Lessons from Metabolomics

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Course Description and Assignments
Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of modern cancer therapy and is an effective treatment, but is often accompanied by toxicity. In this course we will discuss current chemotherapies and their drawbacks, and we will learn about cutting edge advances in cancer treatment and future goals for the field. We will focus on brain toxicity following chemotherapy, a common condition that influences...

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Deep Learning for Biomedical Image Analysis

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Advances in the AI method of deep learning have the potential to transform how biomedical data is analyzed for research, clinical diagnosis and prognosis. This nanocourse will deliver information and allot guided practice so that anyone can apply the principles and algorithms of deep learning to process and analyze their own biomedical images. The purpose of the course is to deliver practical knowledge of deep learning for image analysis including possibilities, current limitations and challenges. Participants with and without programming experience are encouraged to attend!

...

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General Quantitative Microscopy and Experimental Design

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Light Microscopy is currently a widespread tool for scientific discovery. Advances in this field including the development of brighter and better dyes and fluorescent proteins and techniques that go beyond the optical resolution limit have shaped the way scientist do science. Furthermore, the inherent quantitative nature of light microscopy makes it a powerful tool to solve biological problems in both live and fixed samples and really goes beyond a pretty picture.

SESSION 1: December 3rd 2-5 pm (open to everyone) Cannon Room, Building C

  • ...
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Arduino for Biologists: Building scientific instruments using Arduino

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Director: John Assad

Instructors: Ofer Mazor, Pavel Gorelik, Brett Graham

Course description:

The Arduino is a powerful and inexpensive digital microcontrollers that can be used to develop custom lab instruments. Many tasks that used to require a PC or expensive hardware can be put together with an Arduino and tens of dollars worth of parts. Developing microcontroller-based tools allows researchers to automate and scale up aspects of their research that were previously unfeasible.

This nanocourse will cover the basics of programming an...

Read more about Arduino for Biologists: Building scientific instruments using Arduino

CRISPR Gene Editing for Studying Disease Pathology and Treating Human Disease

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) RNAs and their CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins are an important part of adaptive immune systems in many prokaryotes. CRISPR-Cas systems function as RNA-directed endonucleases that can target nucleic acids in a sequence-specific manner and are now widely used as genome editing tools. In this course, we will provide lectures covering: an introduction to genome editing and cutting-edge improvements to CRISPR-Cas systems; a review of bioinformatics tools for guide RNA design and analysis of CRISPR-Cas data; and an overview of...

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Optics and Light Microscopy for Life Sciences: Introduction

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

Light microscopy is a key component of life science research. Many systems are available on the HMS quad to image samples from the nanometric to the macroscopic scale, whether the samples are live or fixed, fluorescent or stained.
This nanocourse aims at refreshing the fundamentals of light and optics, explains the various components of microscopes and basic software controls in order to acquire the best image. We will also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of common microscopes to help you choose the right modality for your experiments.
In the workshop, we will dissect a...

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Single-Cell Sequencing: Experimental Design, Analysis, and Practical Applications

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

Single-cell sequencing technologies allow us to study genomes and transcriptomes at the single cell level. These relatively new techniques have expanded our knowledge in a wide range of fields from microbiology to development and cancer biology. This course will provide a general introduction to both RNA and DNA-based single-cell sequencing. We will start with a broad overview of RNA-sequencing in single cells with an emphasis on current and emerging technologies. Subsequent lectures will focus on experimental design for single-cell experiments and common approaches to data analysis....

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Algorithmic Thinking: How you should be thinking about your data

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

The objective of this nanocourse is to encourage students to perform complex bioinformatic and data analysis questions in their own research with a modular and methodical approach. During the first day, students will learn what an algorithm is and be introduced to the concept of algorithmic thinking. Students will learn to take problems relevant to computational biology and craft solutions in the form of flowcharts and general pseudocode. On the second day, students will learn how to transform the flowcharts and general pseudocode into very specific pseudocode. In this second session,...

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CRISPR Gene Editing for Studying Disease Pathology and Treating Human Disease

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) RNAs and their CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins are an important part of adaptive immune systems in many prokaryotes. CRISPR-Cas systems function as RNA-directed endonucleases that can target nucleic acids in a sequence-specific manner and are now widely used as genome editing tools. In this course, we will provide lectures covering: an introduction to genome editing and cutting-edge improvements to CRISPR-Cas systems; a review of bioinformatics tools for guide RNA design and analysis of CRISPR-Cas data; and an overview of...

Read more about CRISPR Gene Editing for Studying Disease Pathology and Treating Human Disease